Succulents are usually known for their rich, vivid green color—but have you ever noticed your succulents changing color over time?

If you’re itching to add a pop of color to your succulent terrarium, planters, or landscape, we know just the trick! Tampa Succulents is going to shed some light on how and why succulents change colors. Read on to learn and try it out for yourself!

Succulent Stressors

Some succulents may change colors according to the seasons, the frequency and amount they are watered, or according to daily temperature changes. Even succulents kept indoors or in the same conditions year round experience changes in color. These changes in color are often caused by mild to moderate forms of stress.

There are many environmental factors that can affect how vibrant or how dull your succulents’ colors are. Changes in temperature, water, and sunlight can all put moderate stress on succulents and consequently change their colors. For example, when succulents endure periods of drought, this stressor causes the succulent to produce high levels of pigmentation. However, the biggest external factor in succulent color changes lies in the amount of sunlight they receive.

How and Why Does Sunlight Affect Succulent Color?

Just like our skin produces more pigmentation when we are exposed to higher levels of sunlight, so do our succulents! Succulents naturally produce more pigmentation to prevent their leaves from burning in the sun. Likewise, just as people’s skin color can pale or fade from a lack of sunlight, succulents also noticeably lose pigmentation and color from low-light levels.

The three main pigments found in succulents are chlorophyll, carotenoids, and anthocyanins. Chlorophyll is responsible for the succulent’s green color while carotenoids are responsible for yellow to orange hues and anthocyanins for red, blue, or purple shades. Each pigment has a specific function in the plant cells and will become more or less active depending on the sunlight, water, and temperatures. When placed in the sun or extreme temperatures, carotenoids and anthocyanins accumulate in higher concentrations to protect the plant from excessive UV exposure, resulting in the brilliant shade changes to yellows, oranges, reds, pinks, purples, and blues.

Signs that your succulents may be suffering from a lack of sunlight are fading, greening, stretching, and the centers opening wide and flat in search of sunlight. Signs that your succulents may be suffering from too much sunlight are colors brightening, colors shifting tones from green to red, and the centers closing and tightening themselves to protect themselves from the sun. Though a lack of light or too much light can stress succulents, it doesn’t create a point of no return. Most light problems can be completely fixed when the signs are caught early.

Of course, the idea of “stressing” your succulents with sunlight may concern you, but fear not. Succulents are incredibly hardy and can endure mild to moderate levels of stress. In fact, succulents growing in their native environments experience these kinds of external stressors year round as they undergo changes in temperature, water, and sunlight.

How to Get Colorful Succulents by Increasing Sunlight

Though succulents are resilient and can endure moderate levels of stress, it is recommended that you monitor your succulents closely during this process to prevent serious sun damage or possibly killing your succulent. In addition, monitor the weather. Don’t subject your succulents to either extreme heat or cold while increasing sun exposure. Extreme temperature changes will add too much extra stress to your succulent.

The first step is to determine your succulents’ current light levels and what type of light they are receiving. Is your succulent an indoor or outdoor plant? Does your succulent enjoy partial shade, full sun, or both? How long does your succulent tolerate the sun daily? These are all questions you will need to answer before creating your game plan. If your succulents are used to partial shade, you should not introduce them to full sun immediately. You will want to gradually transition your succulents to full sun over a 1-2 week period. Succulents used to partial shade will most likely need the full 2 weeks to safely transition to full sun exposure.

As a general rule of thumb, it is recommended keep your succulent at the same light level to for a few days before increasing the light exposure. Most people will start with bright shade for about 4-7 days, then move to partial sun for 4-7 days, and then onwards to full, direct sun exposure. With each incremental increase, you can also extend your succulent’s time in the sun an extra 30 minutes. Continue this increase in exposure until you reach about 6-8 hours of bright, direct sunlight exposure daily. Succulents need bright sunlight for at least 6-8 hours a day to become “stressed” and display their bright colors.

Continue to monitor your succulent’s color and reaction to the increased sunlight. In addition, continue watering your succulent when the soil is dry. The frequency of your watering may increase as more sunlight evaporates the moisture in the soil. Though temperature and water changes can also enhance a succulent’s pigmentation, it is wise to only use one color-enhancing method at a time. Too much stress can damage and kill your succulents!

Can All Succulents Change Color?

Technically, yes! There are some succulents like Agave that will always remain green in color regardless of their environmental conditions and stressors. If you want to turn your succulents into gorgeous shades of pink, red or purple, Sedum is a great variety that tolerates full sun and turns into these striking shades. If you’re looking for cooler tones, try Blue Spruce, a variety of Sedum that features beautiful muted blue tones. Sempervivums, Echeverias, Aloes, Aeoniums, Kalanchoes, and Crassulas are also great succulent varieties that can change into vibrant colors!

 

Got any questions? Drop us a comment below!

If you’re having problems with your succulents, the answer could lie in the soil. Many care problems can be avoided and cleared up simply by using the right soil for your succulent or cactus.

If you have succulents or cacti, you likely know these plants need a different type of soil than most plants in order to grow and thrive. There are several factors that can determine the right soil for your succulent or cactus. Using the wrong type of soil can result in a seemingly endless amount of care issues.

What is the Best Succulent Soil?

The best kind of soil for any succulent is a well-draining soil. Drainage is essential for succulent soil because succulents’ ability to tolerate long periods without water makes them more susceptible to root rot if they are left to soak in wet soil.

Mimicking the conditions of a plant’s natural, or native, environment is key to growing any type of plant. Succulents in their native environments typically grow in sandy, gravelly, or gritty soils. In many cases, succulents even grow in rocky crevices or along cliff sides. Gritty soils like these can get drenched by heavy rains and still dry out quickly because the sharp, grainy texture is incredibly well-draining.

Many factors can influence how long a soil will remain wet. For example, the amount of water, sunlight, or airflow can all affect a succulent’s dry time. Optimal drying times balance all of these variables accordingly. For example, an indoor succulent with less air flow and sunlight will likely need a more gritty, textured soil to prevent root rot and subsequent pests. An outdoor succulent in a hot, windy region will likely need a more compact soil to avoid the need of frequent watering.

Drainage Holes

Pots with drainage holes support the long-term growth of succulents. Even the best succulent soil cannot prevent root rot and decay if you overwater or if your container doesn’t have adequate drainage holes. In addition, a layer of rocks at the bottom of your succulent container doesn’t add drainage—in fact, it creates pockets of water that will eventually breed bacteria. Consequently, gravel additions to soil should always be mixed throughout the soil, not layered at the bottom.

Organic vs. Inorganic Mineral Soil

Soil is naturally made up of both organic material and inorganic mineral material. In reference to soil, organic refers to things that were once alive. Conversely, minerals are naturally inorganic, meaning the substances do not come from living organisms. For example, tree bark and plant matter are organic substances while gravel or sand are inorganic mineral substances.

Both organic and inorganic are needed to create a healthy succulent soil. Organic elements store water and provide nutrients while inorganic minerals provide drainage. An optimal mix of organic and mineral matter will support succulent growth, improve drainage, and prevent root rot. In addition, this kind of soil allows gardeners to water succulents according to their native conditions: deeply but infrequently.

Common organic matter mixed in succulent soil includes: potting soil, compost, pine bark, or coconut coir. Common minerals used in succulent soil include: sharp sand, perlite, pumice, gravel, or chicken grit. It is generally advised to avoid minerals that store water, such as clay or vermiculite. Both will retain too much moisture and create soggy soil.

Texture and Porosity of Inorganic Minerals

The inorganic mineral section of succulent soil is broken into 3 different texture types based on size. The largest to smallest are sand, silt, and clay. Each grit size will affect how much water the soil can hold and how long it will take to dry out. For example, sandy soils will dry out faster than clay soils because they have larger particles, or a higher porosity. High porosity is best for growing succulents because it provides optimal drainage.

DIY Soil Recipe

Creating your own succulent soil is a little more difficult than purchasing a pre-made one, but it is a great way to specifically tailor the soil to all of your succulents or cacti. This all-purpose recipe blends one-third organic material and two-thirds inorganic minerals. You can mix-and-match your ingredients as you choose. Organic materials could include: compost, potting soil, pine bark, or coconut coir. Inorganic mineral additions could include: pumice, coarse sand, perlite, chicken grit, or gravel. This general recipe can of course be modified or adapted based on your environment, growing conditions, materials available, succulent type, and more. In addition, take note of the amount of time it takes your soil to dry after drenching your succulent. You can then adjust the organic-to-inorganic ratio as needed.

There isn’t one right answer to creating a great succulent soil. Most prepackaged soils can also be adapted and modified to suit a variety of growing conditions and succulent needs.

Got any soil questions? Drop us a comment below!

With over 150 species to choose from, the Echeveria plant still reigns as one of the most popular succulents to grow. Hailing from the Crassulaceae family, Echeveria plants are native to semi-arid desert regions in Mexico, Central America, and South America. They are even found growing naturally in Texas.

This succulent variety forms beautiful clusters of compact rosettes, which grow 2 to 6 inches on short stems with plump, water-storing leaves.

Echeveria comes in many different colors, shapes, and sizes. The succulent can be bright green, blue-green, pink, purple, dusty gray, purple, black, and red depending on the variety. The outer edges of the succulent leaves can even be tinged red or pink. In addition, every spring and summer, Echeverias produce beautiful bell-shaped blooms, ranging from white to bright red and anything in-between. The Echeveria plants’ blossoms are polycarpic, meaning they will come back annually! These colorful flowers provide beautiful contrast to the succulent foliage.

Echeveria plants are well-loved for their attractive appearance and their general low-maintenance. Whether you’re a seasoned gardener or new to the succulent scene, Echeveria is the perfect plant for you! Let’s look at how to best grow and care for your Echeveria plant:

Sunlight Exposure

Echeveria loves bright, indirect sunlight and warm, afternoon temperatures. This succulent will require approximately 6 hours of bright, indirect sunlight during the fall and winter months. In spring and summer, the succulent will need at least 8 to 12 hours of bright, indirect sunlight. If the succulent is indoors, place it near south or west-facing windows, or any window that gets the most light in your house. If grown outdoors, your Echeveria may need some shade during scorching summer temperatures, so they do not burn.

Since succulents grow toward the light, they may start leaning and stretching if your pot or planter isn’t turned once or twice a week. Adequate sun exposure ensures your Echeveria remains symmetrical and compact. It also helps the succulent show its true leaf color, too!

Watering

Though it seems counterintuitive, Echeveria plants actually thrive on brief periods of neglect, which means low levels of watering. Overwatering is one of the biggest problems with succulent care since it can result in root rot.

Echeveria will need to be watered according to the seasonal temperature in your region. It will need more water during sunny spring and summer months and less water during cold, cloudy winter months. As a general guide, we suggest giving your Echeveria a regular drenching every 7 to 10 days during hot temperatures, allowing the plant’s soil to almost dry out between watering. In fall and winter, water your Echeveria sparingly and allow the soil to completely dry out before watering the plant again.

For a homemade moisture meter, we suggest simply using a toothpick. Place the toothpick in your planter’s soil before watering and check back regularly to see when the toothpick is dry. When the toothpick is dry, your succulent soil is ready for more water.

Soil

Like all other succulents, Echeveria plants require well-draining soil to prevent moisture from rotting the roots. Drainage is key when it comes to succulents. Their ability to tolerate droughts makes them more likely to rot if they are left in wet soil. Since Echeveria plants naturally grow and thrive in desert regions, it makes sense that they enjoy low-water conditions. In order for succulents to dry out quickly, they need a gritty, textured soil that provides good airflow. Consider purchasing a succulent or cactus potting mix or making your own. But keep in mind: even the best succulent soil will not save your plant if you overwater it.

Temperature

Most Echeveria varieties are not hardy and usually cannot survive in temperatures colder than 50 degrees Fahrenheit. They prefer warm, dry temperatures from 65 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit, but they can survive hotter summer temperatures. If you live in a region where you have cold winter temperatures, consider using your Echeveria as a houseplant only or bringing your Echeveria indoors during the winter. Once the threats of snow or frost have passed, you can gradually move your Echeveria outdoors again.

Propagation

Some echeveria plants are known for self-propagating. It is easy to separate and grow these offsets and adjust your garden layout as needed.

If you want to try your hand at propagating, the Echeveria is an easy succulent to start with. Simply collect your leaf cuttings—ones that have fallen off the plant or ones you have snipped— lay them flat on the surface of the succulent soil, and wait a few weeks for the leaf to take root. Soon, a small rosette will grow next to the rooted leaf. The initial leaf cutting will eventually dry up and disappear, leaving you a beautiful baby Echeveria! Check out our article “How to Propagate Succulents in 5 Easy Steps” for more details and tips!

Extra Maintenance Tips

Echeveria plants are extremely low-maintenance. They do not need to be overly groomed or pruned. Other than removing occasional dead leaves or blossoms, your Echeveria will be pretty self-reliant!

 

Whether you want to design a show-stopping succulent terrarium or add some groundcover in your garden, Echeveria plants are a great, versatile choice!

 

Got any succulent questions? Drop Tampa Succulents a comment below!

Senecio rowleyanus (also curio rowleyanus) is a popular hanging succulent known as String of Pearls. It is native to the hot, dry climate of East Africa and grows as a terrestrial plant in its natural habitat. The cascading succulent features long, vine-like stems with spherical, pea-sized leaves, looking like a green pearl necklace. The String of Pearls succulent is also called String of Beads, String of Peas, and Rosary Vines. The trailing vines and plump, grape-like leaves look beautiful in planters, hanging baskets, vertical gardens, and as groundcover.

String of Pearls plants are well-loved for their attractive appearance and their general low-maintenance. Whether you’re a seasoned gardener or new to the hanging succulent scene, String of Pearls is the perfect plant for you! Let’s look at how to best grow and care for your String of Pearls indoors and outdoors:

Sunlight

The String of Pearls succulent thrives with a combination of direct and indirect sunlight for duration of at least 6 to 8 hours. As an indoor plant, it will need to be near a window with strong natural light. If you don’t have any bright indirect light indoors, you can also place the succulent 6-12 inches under a fluorescent for about 12 to 16 hours.

As an outdoor plant, the succulent will need some shade as well as direct sun. String of Pearls tends to burn fairly easily in prolonged direct sun. As a result, people will usually allow the plant to bask directly in the weaker morning sun and then place it in a spot with partial shade or more diffused light during peak afternoon sun. In the fall and winter months, the succulent can endure more direct sunlight and less shade.

Temperature

Coming from East Africa, it isn’t surprisingly that String of Pearls succulents love warm weather. The succulent grows best in warm temperatures above 70 degrees Fahrenheit from spring months to the fall. The average indoor temperature for a String of Pearls should remain between 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. String of Pearls plants are not frost tolerant, so during the winter months, they can only endure temperatures around 55 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Move your String of Pearls indoors during cold winter months and keep them away from drafty, air-conditioned areas.

Watering

String of Pearls succulents are particularly sensitive to over-watering since they have shallow roots. As a rule of thumb, water them once of every 2 weeks or once a month during winter months. Make sure the top soil is at least a half-inch dry before watering again. If you plant String of Pearls as terrestrial ground cover, determine your watering frequency depending on the amount of rainfall and sunlight your landscape receives.

For a homemade moisture meter, we suggest simply using a toothpick. Place the toothpick in your planter’s soil before watering and check back regularly to see when the toothpick is dry. When the toothpick is dry, your succulent soil is ready for more water.

Soil

Like all succulents, String of Pearls plants need well-draining soil to prevent soggy roots and eventual root rot. In order for succulents to dry out quickly, they need a gritty, textured soil that provides good airflow. String of Pearls particularly enjoys sandy soil or cactus soil mix. However, any potting mix will do. To make your own, take 3 parts potting soil and mix it with 1 part sharp sand.

In addition to soil, make sure you plant the succulent in a pot that has drainage holes. In addition, terracotta or ceramic clay pots are good choices to draw excess moisture from the soil. But keep in mind: even the best succulent soil and pot will not save your plant if you overwater it.

Propagation

String of Pearls will live for 5 years if cared for properly, but they can keep living continuously through propagation! These succulents grow fast and propagate easily. All you have to do is make some stem cuttings several inches in length, allow the cuts to heal and seal over, lay the cuttings flat on top soil, and wait for them to take root. For more information on propagation, read our article How to Propagate Succulents in 5 Easy Steps.

Flower Blooms

In addition to their beautiful bead-shaped leaves, String of Pearls succulents also boast gorgeous seasonal flower blooms. The unique white flowers tend to bloom in the spring or summer months and have a cinnamon scent. In order to boost your succulent’s chances of blooming, make sure to keep your String of Pearls cool and dry during the winters months—a handy trick to stimulate the flowering process come spring! However, make note, String of Pearls rarely bloom as indoor houseplants.

Toxicity

String of Pearls succulents are toxic to humans and pets if ingested. Though the plant will not prove fatal to either, the consumption of the plant could result in stomach pains, vomiting, and diarrhea. The succulent also produces a sap that can be irritating to skin or produce a rash upon contact. If you plan to keep a String of Pearls plant indoors, ensure it is in a safe, high place to keep it away from pets or children.

Got any succulent questions? Drop Tampa Succulents a comment below!

Looking for a succulent to go bananas over?

We’ve got you covered!

Closely related to the String of Pearls succulent, the String of Bananas (Senecio radicans) trailing succulent is native to South Africa and characterized by its glossy banana-shaped leaves that grow on long, hanging stems. Some people find the String of Bananas succulent to be easier to care for than the String of Pearls succulent because its tendrils are thicker and less prone to break. In addition, the String of Bananas grows faster and is not as likely to dry out like the String of Pearls. String of Bananas can ultimately grow up to 36 inches long!

The String of Bananas succulent is commonly grown indoors as a houseplant because it is not frost tolerant. If grown outdoors, this succulent needs warm weather year round. Like other hanging succulents, the String of Bananas plant looks beautiful in hanging baskets, growing upward in trellises, and in vertical gardens.

String of Bananas succulents are well-loved for their attractive appearance, fast growth, and their general low-maintenance. Whether you’re an expert gardener or new to the hanging succulent scene, String of Bananas is the perfect plant for you! Let’s look at how to best grow and care for your String of Bananas indoors and outdoors:

Sunlight

If grown indoors, the String of Bananas succulent will need about 6 hours of bright, indirect light. If you don’t have a location in your home that gets strong natural light, you can also place the succulent 6-12 inches under a fluorescent light for about 12 to 16 hours. If the String of Bananas does not receive enough light, you will be able to tell when the banana-shaped leaves become more spaced out along the stem. If your String of Bananas is in low light, it will not grow much at all.

As an outdoor plant, the succulent will need some shade as well as direct sun. Keep it out of hot, direct sun during the summer months since it will burn. People will usually allow the plant to bask directly in the weaker morning sun and then place it in a spot with partial shade or more diffused light during peak afternoon sun. In the fall and winter months, the succulent can endure more direct sunlight and less shade.

Temperature

Even though String of Bananas originates from the hot, arid temperatures of South Africa, they still enjoy and flourish in normal household temperatures. As an outdoor plant, the String of Bananas cannot survive in extremely cold temperatures. If you’re in a region that remains reasonably warm year round, your String of Bananas should be okay. If not, bring your String of Bananas indoors for cooler seasons and be sure to keep the succulent away from gusty air conditioning or heating vents.

Watering

String of Bananas succulents are hardy, hanging plants. They are extremely drought-tolerant and have low water needs. There isn’t necessarily a strict watering schedule you need to follow. As a general rule, water your succulent about every 2 weeks or until the soil has been able to dry out. Like the String of Pearls succulent, the String of Bananas succulent is susceptible over-watering and root rot.

In the winter, the String of Bananas will enter a period of dormancy. As a result, the succulent will require less water. Provide just enough moisture to prevent the soil and plant from becoming bone dry.

For a homemade moisture meter, we suggest simply using a toothpick. Place the toothpick in your planter’s soil before watering and check back regularly to see when the toothpick is dry. When the toothpick is dry, your succulent soil is ready for more water.

Soil

Like all succulents, String of Bananas will need well-draining soil to prevent soggy roots and eventual root rot. In order for succulents to dry out quickly, they need a gritty, textured soil that provides good airflow. String of Bananas will enjoy any regular succulent soil or cactus soil mix. However, any potting mix will do. To make your own, take 3 parts potting soil and mix it with 1 part sharp sand.

In addition to soil, make sure you plant the succulent in a pot that has drainage holes. Terracotta or ceramic clay pots are also good choices to draw excess moisture from the soil. But keep in mind: even the best succulent soil and pot will not save your plant if you overwater it.

Propagation

These succulents grow fast and propagate easily. All you have to do is make some stem cuttings several inches in length, allow the cuts to heal and seal over (which can take about 3 to 7 days), lay the cuttings flat on top soil, and wait for them to take root. For more information on propagation, read our article How to Propagate Succulents in 5 Easy Steps.

Flower Blooms

In the fall and winter, the String of Bananas bloom small, fuzzy lavender, white, or yellow flowers that have a faint cinnamon scent similar to the String of Pearls’ annual blooms. The puffy flowers tend curve upwards and some say they aren’t as fragrant as the String of Pearls’ blooms. If your String of Bananas is strictly indoors, it will likely not have seasonal blooms.

Toxicity

String of Bananas succulents are mildly toxic to humans and pets if ingested. Though the plant will not prove fatal to either, the consumption of the plant could result in stomach pains, vomiting, and diarrhea. The succulent also produces a sap that can be irritating to skin or produce a rash upon contact. If you plan to keep a String of Bananas plant indoors, ensure it is in a safe, high place to keep it away from pets or children.

 

Got any succulent questions? Drop Tampa Succulents a comment below!

What’s better than a succulent? A whole garden of succulents, of course!

Lucky for us succulent-lovers, it’s easy to grow a whole collection of these beautiful plants through propagation. Plant propagation is the process of creating new plants from a plant’s leaves, stem, seeds, or other cuttings. So whenever you see sad, fallen leaves surrounding your potted succulent, it’s actually a reason to rejoice! You’ve got yourself some baby succulents on the way!

Materials You Need: A nursery tray, soil, magazine paper, and succulent leaves

Step 1

When your nursery tray is all wiped down and ready to go, lay about six thick sheets of ripped-out magazine paper down until the tray’s holes are covered. Use about three sheets to cover the top half and three sheets to cover the bottom half, give or take. There may be some overlay, but that’s okay!

Step 2

Now it’s soil time! You might consider using a pre-made soil, which has great texture to help keep the succulent leaves dry and has lots of nutrients to grow strong, new plants!

Take about 10 large handfuls of soil and make a mound in the center of the nursery tray. This will give about an inch or so of depth, but feel free to use as much soil as you would like or need to cover the tray. Push the mound down flat and spread the soil to all four corners of the tray, making sure it is even and flat. Since we want the succulent leaves to lay flat on the soil, pluck out any large rocks or twigs disturbing the even surface.

Step 3

Now it’s time to break out your succulent leaves! One by one, take your succulent leaves and place them in the palm of your hand. You’ll notice the leaf having a natural curve, which some call the “belly” of the leaf. Place the belly of your succulent leaf facing down in the soil. Now repeat this process until you have about 7-9 rows of succulent leaves belly down, ordering the succulent leaves however you choose—there is no particular order to follow! Get creative!

Step 4

Once you have placed all of your succulent leaves, place your tray in a bright, but shaded, area where the succulents will be sure to receive enough light. There is no need to water your succulent leaves just yet. Do your best to keep the succulent tray dry by avoiding rain and frost.

Step 5

Now comes the waiting game! It will be a few weeks before you start to see any pink roots growing out of your succulent leaves. Once you see some roots sprouting, mist the leaves with a spray bottle of water about every three days or so. If the weather is particularly dry, spray them a little more often. At this stage, we don’t want to soak the dirt because the leaves could retain too much water, become mushy, and rot—which we do not want!

It will take a few months until you actually start to see a full-formed succulent growing, but when you do, it will make the whole process worthwhile knowing you grew a whole new succulent from a discarded leaf! Succulent propagation is extremely fulfilling and more than a little addictive! Don’t tell us we didn’t we warn you!

Check back with Tampa Succulents for more blogs on growing and caring for your succulents!

Succulents thrive in hot, arid climates since they store water in their roots, stem, and leaves. These hardy plants are well-loved for their striking appearance and general low maintenance, but that doesn’t mean they will be entirely self-sufficient once you bring one home.

Each species of succulents has slightly different care needs, but these beginner tips will give you a good idea what succulents need to thrive!

Make Sure Your Succulent Gets Enough Sunlight

Succulents love sunlight! Just like all other plants, succulents need sunlight to complete their vital, life-giving functions. Generally, succulents will need bright, indirect sunlight about 4 to 6 hours a day. Succulents thrive in bright sunlight, but strong direct sun can quickly burn them. If your succulent is also newly planted, it can scorch and burn with too much light in the beginning. To prevent overexposure to baby succulents, gradually introduce full-sun exposure in increments. Even a sheer curtain that provides some shade will help the succulent until it matures. Fully-rooted, mature succulents can tolerate more sun later on.

Rotate Your Succulents

If your succulent is sitting in the same spot day-after-day, it is likely that it is only getting enough sunlight on one side. To make sure your succulent gets enough light on all sides, rotate it fairly frequently. Succulents will naturally lean toward the sun, so rotation will help keep succulents straight and fully-exposed to the sun. If you find your succulent stretching and leaning, that is a good indication it needs more sunlight and would benefit from rotation or a sunnier spot.

Do Not Overwater Succulents

Succulents are hardy plants, but overwatering can kill them. Generally water succulents every 2 to 3 weeks and allow the soil to dry out between waterings. Succulents will usually need more water if they are in bright, direct light than if they are in lower light. Succulents will also need to be watered more frequently in spring and summer compared to fall or winter.

A weekly or bi-weekly schedule doesn’t always work out, so a good way to test if your succulent needs water is to feel the soil. If the first inch and a half or so feels dry, it is time to water your succulent. Room temperature water is advised since succulents do not like the cold!

Water the Soil Directly

Do not spray your succulent, but rather water the soil directly. Though a spritz of mist sounds refreshing and light, it can actually cause your succulent to have brittle roots and moldy leaves. Soak the soil directly until water runs out of the drainage holes. If your container does not have drainage holes, then water less. If your container does have drainage holes, another way to water it is to place your succulent in a pan of water. Once the water has absorbed through the drainage holes below and the top soil is moist, remove the water pan. Bonus hack: stick a hors d’oeuvres toothpick into your succulent planter and leave it in while watering. Check the toothpick and soil for dampness later on when you think it is time to water again. If they are both dry, you are good to go!

Drain Your Succulents

Succulents do not like waterlogged soil. Good drainage is important to remove excess water and prevent any root rot. Succulents also need good airflow to maintain healthy roots, stems, and leaves. If your current pot doesn’t have any drainage holes, use less water when watering them and carefully tip out any excess water the plant hasn’t absorbed afterward. The goal is to pour enough water that all the soil gets wet but avoid an excess that will keep roots wet. If you pour too much and cannot pour out the excess, use a rag or paper towel to try and gently absorb some of it.

Clean Your Succulents

Yes, you can even add cleaning your succulents to your weekly chore list! Dust and other indoor particles can accumulate on your succulent’s leaves and hinder its growth. Gently wipe off the leaves with a damp wash cloth. If the stem and certain leaves are hard to reach, you can also use a small, damp paintbrush.

 

Do you have any hacks to take care of your succulents? Any questions about succulent care?

Drop us a comment below!

 

Your environment makes a huge difference in how you take care of succulents but hopefully, this will provide a good guide for you that you can adapt to wherever you live!

Watering

The frequency of watering will depend on where you live. Basically, you’ll water the wreath once the moss is completely dry.

We recommend spritzing the moss of your living wreath with water weekly. 

If you live in a dry climate, be careful to give your plants enough water without drowning them. If you are in a more humid or cooler climate you will likely be able to water less, say every other week. Just keep an eye on it and water when it’s dry.

Sunlight

As with all succulents, you want to make sure your wreath gets enough light that the plants don’t stretch. Stretching succulents will make the wreath look overgrown really quickly. On the other hand, you don’t want to put them in direct sunlight, especially in the afternoon when it’s the hottest outside.

While some fully rooted succulents can tolerate full sun, strong direct sunlight is the quickest way to destroy your wreath.

Most doors have some sort of shade over them from a porch or even just the roof. If your door faces south you may want to consider hanging the wreath elsewhere as the south-facing sun in the summer is pretty brutal.

Longevity

A living succulent wreath will last for a full summer and shouldn’t require too much trimming. You can keep your wreath for years to come but you will have to cut back some of the plants to keep it nicely trimmed.

Winter

If your winter climate reaches freezing temperatures and below, you’ll need to bring your wreath in during the winter. Make sure it is in a room that has plenty of sunlight. If you notice stretching you can either wait until the end of the winter and cut the heads off then or get a grow light for some extra help.

Some customers have asked about storing succulent wreaths in the garage, but unless your garage is heated, it could also get too cold for your succulents to survive well.

In the winter months succulents grow very slowly and don’t require as much water, so you won’t need to worry about watering often.

More Care Guides:

Care Guide for a Living Holiday Tree 

Similar to caring for a Living Wreath, the succulents are planted/glued onto moss, however, the trees are made of floral foam tree base.

The frequency of watering will depend on where you live.

Basically, you’ll water the tree once the moss is completely dry.

We recommend spritzing the moss of your Succulent Tree with water about once a week.  

If you live in a dry climate, be careful to give your plants enough water without drowning them. If you are in a more humid or cooler climate you will likely be able to water less, say every other week. Check your plants weekly and water them if they appear to be dry and leaves are wrinkling.

Sunlight

As with all succulents, you want to make sure your succulent tree gets enough light that the plants don’t stretch. Keep it in a room with lots of sunlight, being careful to not place it in a window that has no screen, as it can burn (like a magnifying glass)

Stretching succulents will make the tree look overgrown really quickly.

While some fully rooted succulents can tolerate full sun, strong direct sunlight is the quickest way to destroy your succulent tree.

Longevity

A living succulent tree will last for a the entire holiday season and shouldn’t require too much trimming. You can keep your Succulent Tree for years to come but you will have to cut back some of the plants to keep it nicely trimmed.

Winter

If your winter climate reaches freezing temperatures and below, you’ll need to bring your tree indoors during the winter if you are enjoying it outdoors. Make sure it is in a room that has plenty of sunlight. If you notice stretching you can either wait until the end of the winter and cut the heads off then or get a grow light for some extra help.

Some customers have asked about storing succulent wreaths in the garage, but unless your garage is heated, it could also get too cold for your succulents to survive well.

In the winter months succulents grow very slowly and don’t require as much water, so you won’t need to worry about watering often.

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